Books Q-Z James Silas Rogers, Extended Family, Essays on Being Irish American $18.95

Description

A leading journal of Irish Studies, New Hibernia Review opens each issue with a personal essay. For the first time, here is a selection of the finest of these, of which four have been recognized as “Notable Essays of the Year” in Best American Essays. This engaging collection sheds light on the perplexing state of being an Irish American-though the question is usually posed in deflected ways. Often deeply personal, each account in Extended Family: Essays on Being Irish American from New Hibernia Review tackles this question with verve; the conclusions range from the piquant, to the humorous, to the bittersweet. This book marks a welcome re-evaluation of the Irish Diaspora that is sure to challenge and stimulate our current understandings. James Silas Rogers has previously co-edited After the Flood: Irish America, 1945 – 1960 and published a poetry chapbook, Sundogs. He is the editor of New Hibernia Review at the University of St. Thomas, and served as president of the American Conference for Irish Studies from 2009 to 2011.

Extended Family is a milestone in the long day’s journey of Irish America from cliché, caricature, and scholarly neglect to a true accounting of its important role in the making of our country’s multicultural identity. Each of the pieces in this collection—whether poetry, history, or memoir—is a gem. I was engaged and enlightened from first to last. This is a real achievement.”—Peter Quinn – author of Looking for Jimmy: A Search for Irish America - president and co-founder of Irish-American Writers and Artists

“A rich collection of memoir, poetry and scholarly essays, Extended Family provides fascinating insights into modern Irish American culture. The memoirs are particularly powerful, offering personal testaments to the complexities of home, return and family in Irish American writing. A rare combination of human reflection and quality scholarship, Extended Family is a welcome addition to the dynamic field of Irish diasporic studies.”—Sean Farrell, historian, Northern Illinois University – President, American Conference for Irish Studies

“Both deeply personal as well as penetrating and subtle in their broad analysis of what constitutes Irishness today – a time when traditional ethnic identities are collapsing in the United States – the epiphanies disclosed on page after page of this volume are a revelation. The stories function both individually and collectively as a kind of poetic reverie on the continued relevance of roots, communal memory and cultural connectedness as an antidote to the gray conformity and anomie of modern existence.”—James W Flannery, Emory University – Director, W. B. Yeats Foundation

2013, 256 pages (Dufour)